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Local 325 Delegate Election  




An Injury to One Is An Injury To All!

A Missouri-Illinois Rank-N-File Meeting for all Auto Workers and Trade Unionists

  • Solidarity at Delphi!
  • No Concessions!
  • Team Concept: A One-Way Street!
  • Save Our Public Schools!
  • Stop the War!

Viking Restaurant and Conference Center
10709 Watson Rd
St Louis, Mo 63127

Sunday, March 26, 2006
2:00pm to 5:00pm

For current information on this event:
Go to: www.9898.us/uawcrisis or call 314 479 6454




- Click HERE for ’An Injury to One’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




The Crisis in Auto

Address by Dennis Gallie to the Socialist Organizer 15th Anniversary Celebration, San Francisco CA, USA, Feb. 18, 2006

There is a growing struggle in the auto industry today, but this emerging movement has great faults. The re-opened contracts at General Motors and Ford, the threatened bankruptcy at Delphi, and the relentless advance of ’Team Concept’ at Daimler-Chrysler are all part of a frontal attack on the auto workers rank and file. I could say it is an attack on the UAW, but the leadership of our union condones Team Concept, they recommended the concession contracts to us for approval, and they will not divulge their so-called ’secret plan’ to organize the Delphi workers until it is too late.

I am an autoworker from St Louis, and my plant is closing as part of Ford Motor Companyís ’Way Forward’ corporate plan, which is intended to impress Wall street with itís cruel resolve, and keep up the stock price. This is the ’Way Downward’ for about 30,000 Ford workers and us. Another 30,000 autoworkers at General Motors will also lose their jobs in the next few years. The first thing to realize about these events is that they are not autonomous market forces of global competition, which just happen to have unfortunate results on some workers. These are the actions of particular companies; and it is not as though the world is stopping the production of cars. Nor is it a question of other workers gaining what we are losing. Look at the coal miners: we are shocked when some American miners die unnecessarily at a non-union mine, for lack of a simple GPS device that would have cost the company a hundred dollars. But Chinese miners are dying at the rate of thousands per year in hellholes, just to feed the requirements of global imperialism. Do those workers benefit from the production lost from American mines? Do we benefit from their abysmal conditions? All this begs the question of international solidarity. We are told that the Chinese car is coming next year, and if it is junk, it will probably be straightened out in another year or so. It is expected to cost 40% less than comparable American cars. So the point is not that I have to make cars, but that I need a paycheck. I am willing and able to work. I am also willing to co-operate with other workers to ensure that our conditions and pay are adequate for a good life.

When I went to Kokomo Indiana, to one of the Delphi workers rank-and-file meetings, the first thing I noticed was the sour taste everybody had for the UAW International leadership. There was no illusion at all. There was no confusion about loyalty. There was no tendency towards obedience to mis-leaders. In fact, I learned the story of the Accuride strike and its betrayal by the UAW International, which was something new to me, and I think every UAW member should read about it. I found out that there is a lot of resolve to carry out the in-plant strategy among the Delphi workers, and there are a lot of other retired and active workers in other plants willing to help. The bankruptcy court will soon ’decide a question of law’ or ’team-up with the company to rob the workers’ depending on how you look at it. I was a little disappointed when we chose the name ’Soldiers of Solidarity’ because it emphasizes the chauvinism and potential violence that slows us down. Violence will be used against our struggle, but ours is not a military operation. It is a question of organizing our solidarity. Another major flaw in the movement is an unwillingness to address the War in Iraq. There is a growing internationalism in SOS, but some are interpreting it as ’We can show our friends how to do it!’ rather than ’We need help from our friends, and we have one big obligation to our friends: Stop the war’. We can’t be loyal to God, and loyal to our country, way up there, as we rebel against the corrupt union leaders way down here.

I donít really know yet whether the companies and the government can manage the downsizing of the auto industry, or whether the rank-and-file reaction will be the beginning of a larger movement. Certainly SOS has a lot going for it: it is independent of personality caucuses, and it is shop floor oriented. It is a rank-and-file movement that is consciously trying to be diverse and international. It is reaching out for the solidarity of non-Delphi workers and telling them the truth that ’you are next’ and that concessions don’t save jobs. Everything depends on the solidarity and aid of active, retired, and laid off UAW members. We can defend the Delphi workers by joining their pickets, hosting solidarity rallies, and pushing the International UAW to really support the ’Work-to-Rule’ campaign, support the Delphi strike when it comes to that, and GM strike when it comes to that, and a general auto strike if it comes to that! With both feet on the ground, SOS knows that Solidarity House will be working exactly in the opposite direction at each point of this potential scenario.

But you also have to look at this from the global patriarchís viewpoint, to be fair. If Delphi has success using the courts to cut union wages, outsource to low-wage plants, evade the taxes that workers pay for American military invasions of other folkís countries to keep wages low, well then General Motors is entitled to do the same thing. After all, it’s the same company. Then comes Ford, my employer, or ex-employer. Ford said ’Me too’ when GM got healthcare concessions, and Ford got them from us. I told my co-workers we got robbed on the way out of the plant. Some of us picketed the union hall and held up signs saying VOTE NO. So what is to keep Ford or even WalMart from seeking court protection to lower wages and benefits? In a sense, Ford just went bankrupt in St Louis without going bankrupt in Louisville, Kentucky! Louisville Assembly makes Ford Explorers just like we do, so when we close down in three weeks, that production goes to Louisville, and they will probably work ten hours a day to keep up. There will be overproduction in Kentucky and simultaneously underproduction in Missouri. Now, getting back to the trend here, I think you can see where this logic is leading: All the major companies are running to the government saying ’We can’t make enough money off these people under current conditions. We have to close this plant, or you have to hold the workers while we rob them.’ I think the workers begin to develop greater understanding of private property in the means of production, and less respect for it as this process goes on. With greater understanding comes better organization and more effective resistance. When a judge can call you ’out’ any time the boss pays him, then we lose our respect for the rights of ownership, and we start thinking of the plant as the place where we work: and how it has to be run right with a good wage for everybody who works. And how we have to stay in the plant to guarantee this.

Several of us from Ford and Daimler-Chrysler came back from the November SOS meeting in Indiana, and decided to try our own area-wide autoworkers meeting in St Louis. We got a free union hall (not UAW), and free copying of our leaflet, so the only major task was publicizing it in the three auto plants. It was a pretty good turnout, and the discussion came up with a really creative counter proposal to the healthcare concession contract that had just passed at GM: take the dues money that doesnít go directly toward bargaining, and put that toward retiree healthcare. As long as we were at it, we proposed all joint funds go to retiree healthcare. This is borderline union disloyalty, but itís one way of saying the rank-and-file want to pay only what is legally required under agency shop, and we disapprove of what you do with our money. It also says we know these un-audited joint funds are inherently corrupt, and make the international leadership directly dependent on the companies. The concessions still passed in my local by53%, and nationally by 51%. I am part of the national appeal to the UAW Convention Appeals Committee to overturn this vote on the basis that we never saw the contract language, only a summary, that the retirees could not vote, and that there was insufficient time between reading the summary, meeting to discuss it, and voting. I have also filed an appeal with my local. This committee is a creature of the international union convention, and is chosen by lot from all the elected delegates. It has been known in rare cases to overrule the International Executive Board, and the International President. In fact, I would not be addressing you today as a UAW member, were it not for the Convention Appeals Committee. The Convention Appeals Committee reversed all lower bodies, and ordered the local to re-instate my grievance against Ford Motor Company, which fired me on a frame-up charge.

A Daimler-Chrysler worker, Tim, hosted our December meeting, and got elected committeeperson on the basis of this upsurge of resentment over the attacks on our union. I his case, out at Daimler-Chrysler, the plant is actually expanding. As usual, the company has wrested tax concessions from the state and local bodies as a reward for staying here, and using up our local people. In addition, Daimler forced the local union into signing on to unbridled Team Concept. Tim opposed it consistently, spoke at the in-plant meetings, organized the plant floor action. Thatís why he was elected. He is supported by small group of outspoken activists, who publish in-plant newsletters, and regularly communicate.

In summary, these rank-and-file efforts, no matter how small, or fumbling or confused or isolated, are really all we have right now in the way of resistance. They are actually creating democracy in the face of uncontrolled greed and dominance. Therefore they are going in the right direction.



- Click HERE for ’The Crisis in Auto’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




A Tale of Two Cities: Inside, The Auto Show; Outside, Auto Workers Picket!

Dennis Gallie

’Wages, Healthcare, not to mention; we will fight to save our pension!’ Autoworkers chanted this again and again, as they marched up and down the sidewalk outside Cobo Hall in Detroit. It was the Jan 8, 2006 opening day of the International Auto Show, and about 700 workers came from around the Midwest, from St Louis, Minneapolis, from New York, California, and Canada. They came to tell the American public and workers around the world about the corporate attacks on the UAW.

While the global auto corporations celebrated a glut of expensive and impractical idea cars inside Cobo Hall, and got drunk in the Chryslerís upscale ’Firehouse Boutique’ across the street, some of the people who do the work of making these vehicles were marching out in the cold to make a point. Many were from Delphi plants, and are faced with a joint attack from the corporation and the courts.

’Not the bosses, not the State; workers will decide their fate!’ Leaders of Soldiers of Solidarity blared it out on the portable sound system, and the marchers took it up with enthusiasm, a forceful voice, and more female than male. The sound system was modest: a hand-truck with two portable speakers next to a home made wooden box, with a small amplifier and a car battery inside. At the base of the hand-truck was a milk crate to hold gloves and water bottles. The sound system and chant leader followed a ten-foot homemade puppet that represented Mother Jones, the old-time leader of the mineworkers, who once said at workerís funeral ’Pray for the dead, but fight like hell for the living!’

’Work to Rule! Work to rule! Work to rule!’ was the chant outside the auditorium. At the corporate party inside the Firehouse Boutique, however, the television news reporter clowned with a Chrysler executive about how much syrup goes into a really good drink. The Soldiers of Solidarity have their work cut out for them inside the Delphi plants, and are dedicated to soberly evaluating what needs to be done. In the face of an out-of-control Global corporation with a union-buster CEO, they are struggling against the bankruptcy courts that have a Team Concept going with the executives. The courts are being asked to approve a 60% wage cut. The rank-and-file strategy is to stay in the plant and work according to established quality and safety procedures; to await instructions from the managers, and then work normally. A point will be reached where further industrial action will halt General Motors production. As workers recall what happened at Caterpillar and Accuride, they know that they will now have to get all the solidarity they can from other locals; and watch their back with the International UAW.

’Not one dollar, not one dime; cutting wages is a crime!’ That was the chant of the UAW rank and file on January 8, right after the December concession votes at GM and Ford allegedly passed by a slim margin. These must have been exceptional autoworkers on the streets of Detroit, to disagree 180 degrees from their union leaders. Or, maybe they are the new leaders! Likewise the Canadians who came from the CAW. The Canadian Auto Workers, who had a hard time getting through the border, had their Union flag and a beautiful printed banner composed of all the female leaders of the labor movement. They told me the Immigration Service apparently wanted them to say they were going to a ’Protest’ instead of a ’Parade’, and to make a liar out of them. I think we did a lot of parading around, and yes, we did protest the destruction of our wages and pensions! And yes, it does help us to get solidarity from across the border. The interesting thing about the Canadians is that they are still able to ’lock down’ a plant in an extreme bargaining situation. This is to say, that a local membership with enough solidarity may choose to occupy the plant, until a satisfactory agreement is reached. I asked how they keep intruders out, and the Canadians said they have, in some cases, welded the doors shut.

Organizing meetings for the Delphi workers are taking place in many cities and towns. They are continuing, and are being organized out of the www.soldiersofsolidarity.com and www.futureoftheunion.com websites. An open one is slated for Milwaukee on January 15, and a Troy, Michigan meeting will be limited to active Delphi.



- Click HERE for ’A Tale of Two Cities’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute. Click HERE for the January 8, 2006, Detroit Auto Show action handbill as a .pdf page.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




One Autoworkerís View

Dennis Gallie, January 9, 2006

I donít know if anyone bothered to put the ’Spin-o-Meter’ on Henry Fordís grave yesterday, but it probably would have registered way up in the red zone, when the rank-n-file UAW picketed the Auto Show in Detroit. In bygone days, workers didnít know much about global corporations and cooking the books. They didnít challenge the bossís rights until they were near starvation. They just reacted naturally to the local situation. Eventually, they banded together into a great industrial union known as the UAW, and secured many economic gains. Today, we may have lost our labor organization to labor bureaucrats, and we have lost some of our ability to act together, but we certainly have more information about the world in which we live. What is happening in this ’Information Age’ is a renewed democratic self-organization of labor from the bottom up. ’Soldiers of Solidarity’ is an example of this self-organization. There may be a globalization of the corporations that control our paychecks, but there is now a globalization of the exploited and oppressed.

We probably made a mistake by marching directly at the police line, as if to claim our free speech rights to be directly in front of Cobo Hall. We werenít prepared for a confrontation, and it was not on the agenda. Old Henry probably thought that the Detroit police missed a golden opportunity to bust heads, and the ’Spin-o-Meter’ might have overheated at this point. After all, when the unemployed Ford workers marched on Dearborn during the Great Depression, Henry just ordered his private militia to open fire.

As it was on Sunday, the march simply stopped and turned around, and went back to the ’free speech’ area. Later in the day, the same tactic was used, under a different rank and file leader, and had the same result. Many of us understood that this was a provocation, and remained behind. Some of the designated Soldiers of Solidarity Martials also saw the danger, and told us to turn around because we were not set up for this. Our movement is solid, but young. It is open, democratic, generous, and hardworking; but inexperienced in many ways. We have a lot to learn about the real nature of the courts, the police and the Democrat-Republican method of legislation. We need to learn that our ability to organize is superior to the company-government violence. Our purpose last Sunday was informational, not confrontational. Had the local government decided to take the opportunity to call us the aggressors, they could have made arrests and hurt some of us. I think the reason they chose not to do this, is because it would look so bad to have this contrast broadcast in the media: luxury and bravado inside the hall, and the beating of the autoworkers outside the hall. It was their call. Some will say that it is always their call, and that is true, but we need not make it easier for them. In the end, it wasnít our American flags that protected us. We have to claim more of our free speech rights, and there is always a danger in that, but we can learn some tactics from the anti-war movement and the movements for racial justice and womenís rights.

The contradiction of the newscasters is that they were there, but they didnít cover the picket! There were numerous local and national television crews, but the picket got only about five seconds on the local news, and a brief summary on national news. The Auto Show itself was featured for hours on local TV. I think there was no story for them unless things got out of order with some kind of police riot. The message that we had for them about our wages and pensions was not ’hard news’. In retrospect, we need to get the alternative media out there covering us, and we need to relate to the other movements, such as the anti-war movement and US Labor Against the War. Where was the ’Democracy Now’ cable TV alternative news program? I know that Amy Goodman does not have resources to cover anything and everything, but this rank-and file effort was important. We related to the local AFSCME workers in Detroit, and a few of them joined our picket.

The point about the flags is that we are not Americans first, and workers second. Delphi has shown you this by going bankrupt in the US, while remaining profitable worldwide, and getting the American courts to go along with this story. If we are to get anywhere in this struggle to save our jobs and pensions, we have to unite with other workers globally.

We are getting over the ’company loyalty’ that was foisted on us by the companies and by the UAW international. We are getting over our blind obedience to our UAW leaders, who do nothing but promote concessions. Now it is time to get over the ’American Jobs’ thing. There really is no such thing as an American job. You are in direct competition with the Bangladeshi worker and the Chinese worker. It really is a race to the bottom if the Global corporations hold all the strings. American workers have to somehow make their peace with workers in other lands, and proceed against the global corporations. UAW members have to make their peace with unorganized workers in this industry, as well as organized and unorganized women and men across America. Patriotism and the flag become irrelevant at this point. You canít win this life-and-death struggle as an American.

On the 6 oíclock news they reported that Honda had won both the car-of-the-year and truck-of-the-year awards: the first time in history for any manufacturer. The newscaster reported this with a furrowed brow, and assured us that the ’Big Three’ were doing well in other ways. But what do we care about the business fortunes of any one company? Any three companies?

Thereís really no difference between Chrysler and Toyota, because both of these corporations used to be in the Apartheid South African Nation, making money for their stockholders under the most extreme labor conditions. That tells you a lot, and thatís why we need to study our global labor history. The white guys were all foremen or skilled trades, and had their own ’union’, while the blacks worked on the line and had a separate union. African autoworkers lived in barracks, had near-starvation wages, could not get married, or even travel freely No women were allowed to work. Fast-forward to 2006, and the economic exploitation of the big global corporations is still there in South Africa. There is now widespread poverty and Aids. Apartheid came crashing down in 1990, and the government is no longer a white enclave; the dominant party is overwhelmingly Black. It was a long hard struggle to get something that could be called a Nation. So how can racial and economic injustice still prevail at this late date? And does this continued injustice abroad help the US autoworker at home? The answer is NO. When Apartheid fell, the South African majority was unable to get control the auto plants and the industry of their nation. Industry is still controlled by large global corporations, and a small number of local businessmen. Politics made a giant leap when Apartheid was scrapped, but economics stayed the same. We live in a global world where nations donít represent workers.

Chrysler is now DaimlerChrysler, a German corporation, which the Detroit media says is one of the ’Big Three’. These media misleaders are all confused and are trying to confuse us autoworkers. It makes no difference, which companies are in the Big Three, or call themselves ’American’. As autoworkers, it makes no difference whether we work for a company based in the USA, or Japan, or Germany. We have the same struggle to keep up our wages and pensions. DaimlerChrysler workers here in St Louis are facing the same take back demands that have just been passed at GM and Ford. They happen to be expanding the plant, but now the company is demanding Team Concept, as well as the pension and wage take-backs. Workers out there at DaimlerChrysler have two separate UAW locals for two plants that sit side-by-side, and that is something I could never figure out. But they have figured out that the company is making money, and has no right to demand concessions, and Team Concept rules that weaken the union on the shop floor. So there is a movement out there to resist, and even to elect more worker-friendly committeepersons.

Meanwhile the Ford plant here, where I work, is about to close. We are expecting an announcement Jan 23, 2006 from the company. Since the UAW international clams that we agreed 51% to 49% to the pension take backs, we feel like we have been robbed on the way out. GM is already making rumblings about getting out of their contractual job-bank obligations, just as they are getting out of their retiree healthcare obligations. Naturally, I expect Ford to follow suit, and try to leave me without a pension and without a job by 2007.

This is why I left the American flag at home when I went up to the protest in Detroit. I brought the ’US Labor Against the War’ banner that we use in St Louis, and strung it between two trees. It got a good reception from everybody that noticed it. Letís face it: the elephant in the middle of the room is the War in Iraq. Whenever labor gets together, as we did so effectively last Sunday, the enormous costs of the Iraq war are present but not accounted for. These enormous costs, in terms of lives and dollars, have been foisted on the shoulders of labor. Are we ignoring this? Are we following Solidarity House one last time? We passed an anti-war resolution in my local, but only after dodging a lot of ’flak’ from the local leadership. They used the Veterans Committee to oppose the resolution, but it passed anyway. And if you talked to any of the veterans in the plant, a great majority was against the war anyway! They all were familiar with this fact: the day the invasion was announced, our government cut veterans benefits.

In conclusion, I will do everything I can to remain active in SOS, as well as USLAW. As UAW members, our obligation is to support the Delphi workers in their work-to-rule and strike efforts. We need to push resolutions and actions in our locals supporting them.


- Click HERE for ’One Autoworkerís View’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




VOTE NO!

Our UAW and Ford Motor Company have a contract until September 2007. We do not have to ratify a tentative agreement, because we already have an agreement. It is not our fault that healthcare costs have gone up, and this was factored into the negotiations in 2003. Vote NO to these concessions, and let the chips fall where they may. Itís a dollar-an-hour cut for active workers, and a $752/year loss for retirees.

St Louis rank-and-file autoworkers and retirees gathered Sunday Dec 11, 2005 to discuss the crisis in their industry and union. By consensus, we decided that the giveback demands of the big auto companies are unjust. We donít want these concessions. We saw that when General Motors workers voted for them, GMís ’thank you’ was the plan for 30,000 new layoffs! We know that Daimler-Chrysler will be next. (And then GM round #2, etc, etc)

A counter-proposal was hammered out at the meeting, which finds other sources of revenue: we propose that the UAW membership as a whole take that portion of our dues-money that doesnít go directly for bargaining, and devote it to the new ’slush-fund’ that is proposed by the International and the Company. Add to the slush fund the money called ’joint-funds’ which come from the company, but are jointly spent by the union and the company on demoralizing projects, which corrupt the union, and pit one worker against the other. These secret joint-funds pay the ’clip boarders’ and appointees, and are estimated to be as big as our international strike fund, or one billion dollars. Please consider this counter-proposal after you vote NO!

St Louis Ford UAW 325 workers are faced with the plant closing, and the company is still not saying anything; we proceed by rumors, and we will be the last to be informed. Read your morning paper to see if you have a job today! We say vote ’NO’ on concessions. Donít get robbed on the way out! Everybody will have to live with diminished healthcare for the rest of our lives, whether we retire, move to another plant, or lose our right to a UAW job. And why would we wish this on future generations of UAW people or other locations?

Our UAW brothers and sisters at Delphi are faced with a very serious threat, and are fighting it with a rank-n-file movement, which is self-organized from the bottom up. These ’Soldiers of Solidarity’ are going to picket the Detroit Auto Show on its first day, January 8, 2006. And we have to send up a car caravan of volunteers to help them picket and find out how they get the strength to do what they do.

Stay in touch and write your contact info on the clipboard. Please get contact information of co-workers! Stay tuned to our website: www.9898.us/uawcrisis.


- Click HERE for ’VOTE NO!’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




A Counter Proposal

St Louis rank-and-file autoworkers and retirees gathered Sunday Dec 11, 2005 to discuss the crisis in their industry and union. By consensus, it was decided that the giveback demands of the big auto companies have to be resisted at all costs. In particular, we agreed to push for a ’NO’ vote on Ford Motor Companyís announced contract re-opening deal with the UAW International Union. We donít want these concessions. We saw that when General Motors workers voted for them, GMís ’thank you’ was the plan for 30,000 new layoffs! We know that Daimler-Chrysler will be next. (And then GM round #2, etc, etc)

A counter-proposal was hammered out at the meeting, which finds other sources of revenue: we propose that the UAW membership as a whole take that portion of our dues-money that doesnít go directly for bargaining, and devote it to the new ’slush-fund’ that is proposed by the International and the Company. Add to the slush-fund the money called ’joint-funds’ which come from the company, but are jointly spent by the union and the company on demoralizing projects, which corrupt the union, and pit one worker against the other. These secret joint-funds pay the ’clipboarders’ and appointees, and are estimated to be as big as our international strike fund, or one billion dollars.

St Louis Ford UAW 325 workers are faced with the plant closing, and the company is still not saying anything; we proceed by rumors, and we will be the last to be informed. Read your morning paper to see if you have a job today! No word from the International on exactly what retiree healthcare concessions are being asked for. Why the secrecy? Would it spoil the negotiations? Would it be unfair to members who donít have a slick Concession-brochure to explain away the bad news? We say vote ’NO’ on concessions. Donít get robbed on the way out! Everybody will have to live with diminished healthcare for the rest of our lives, whether we retire, move to another plant, or lose our right to a UAW job. And why would we wish this on future generations of UAW people or other locations?

Daimler-Chrysler UAW 110 workers, who had a great turnout at Sundaysí meeting, know that they will be next on the concession hit list, regardless of how healthy the company is right now.

The meeting also agreed to form a rank-n-file committee to continue the process of informing us, and to promote democratic decision-making. Please come if more meetings are called! Please get contact information of co-workers! Stay tuned to our website: www.9898.us/uawcrisis.


- Click HERE for ’A Counter Proposal’ as an MS Word .doc page that you can print and distribute.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




DO CONCESSIONS SAVE JOBS?

Are concessions to GM, Daimler-Chrysler, and Ford a way to save jobs?
St Louis Auto Workers and Retirees held a
Rank-and-File meeting to discuss:
  • The Delphi bankruptcy and the work-to-rule strategy
  • General Motors retiree health-care givebacks, and 30,000 new layoffs
  • Factory occupations around the world
  • How our situation relates to workers in China, Iraq, Mexico
  • Who’s next for concessions, and what can the rank-and-file do?

Stay in touch and write your contact info on the clipboard. Please get contact information of co-workers! Stay tuned to our website: www.9898.us/uawcrisis.


- Click HERE for the December 2005 flyer as an MS Word .doc page.
- Click HERE to write an email to UAW Crisis now (uawcrisis@aol.com).




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